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2014 CCP Lecture Series

Centre for Contemporary Photography presents an annual series of public lectures.

Echo Chamber: Emerging research on photography
Thursday 20 November 2014, 6pm


CROSSING PATHS WITH VIVIAN MAIER PUBLIC PROGRAMS
A collaboration between CCP and the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, The University of Melbourne

How the 'selfie' performs across time and place
Wednesday 15 October 2014, 6—7.30pm

Lost and Found: Ethics, subjecthood and contemporary art
Wednesday 22 October 2014, 6—7:30pm


Pascal Beausse, Head of Photographic Collections at the Centre National des Arts Plastiques (CNAP) in Paris
Number Three / Knowledge is Power—Two exhibitions curated from the collections of Centre National des Arts Plastiques (CNAP), Paris
Friday 3 October 2014, 6—8pm


THE SIEVERS PROJECT PUBLIC PROGRAMS
Talking Sievers
Wednesday 16 July 2014, 6—8pm

Architectural Photography, then and now
Wednesday 30 July 2014, 6—8pm

The Nature of Commissioning
Wednesday 27 August 2014, 6—8pm

Stalking Sievers
Sunday 17 August 2014, 2—3pm

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Echo Chamber: Emerging research on photography

Thursday 20 November 2014, 6pm
Centre for Contemporary Photography
Free event, no bookings required.


CCP's inaugural Echo Chamber represents a series of occasional, ongoing public programs showcasing current emerging research in all areas of photography, including historical research, technology, communications and contemporary discussion.

Applications to present research for future Echo Chamber public programs are welcome.

Chair

Dr Kyla McFarlane
Associate Curator, Centre for Contemporary Photography

Speakers

Peter Wille

TOBIAS HORROCKS
Through the lens of Peter Wille: a snapshot of mid-century modernism in Melbourne


Peter Wille photographed 1950s and 60s architecture with a mad passion. An architectural draftsman, he spent his weekends driving around Melbourne with his camera, often with a member of his young family in tow. He died tragically, hit by a truck as he stepped onto the road to take a photograph. His collection of over 5,000 colour slides is held by the State Library of Victoria.

Tobias Horrocks is the founder of sustainable design and architecture practice Fold Theory. Specialising in cardboard and utilising digital design and fabrication, Fold Theory aims to push the limits of cardboard engineering to realise forms and structures previously unimaginable. Tobias' professional architectural experience includes 10 years with award-winning Australian practice John Wardle Architects. Tobias teaches architectural history, theory and design at the University of Melbourne.

Image: Peter Wille House. Cromer Road, Beaumaris, Melbourne. Grounds, Romberg — Boyd 1955-56; courtesy of State library of Victoria.


Robert William Harvie

MICHELLE MOUNTAIN
Melbourne Photographer Robert Harvie


Museum Victoria's Harvie Collection consists of almost 500 images relating to the photography and personal life of Melbourne photographer Robert Harvie. Harvie ran a commercial studio in Melbourne from 1898 to about 1909, and was an enthusiastic photographer of his family, who were significant contributors to social life in Ballarat and Melbourne in the mid-late 19th and early 20th century. The Harvie Collection provides a lens through which we can trace the social and cultural history of Robert Harvie and his extended family, as well as explore the evolution of Harvie's photographic practice in formats, techniques and content.

Michelle Mountain is a Museum Victoria volunteer and former intern, who has recently graduated with a Post-Graduate Diploma in Museum Studies. Her previous studies have focused on photography, including a Masters of Art History examining theories of photography. Michelle is currently working part-time as Assistant Gallery Manager at the Centre for Contemporary Photography.

Image: Robert William Harvie Jean Harvie & Woman in Garden circa 1919 -1920, courtesy of Museum Victoria.


Thomas Fisher

SAM VAN DER PLANK
MH&IS in the Middle East


Sam van der Plank recently completed his thesis on the photographic activities of the Military History and Information Section [MH&IS] in the Middle East from August 1941 to mid-1942. This organisation was established to create a comprehensive pictorial record commemorating Australia's overseas involvement in World War II for the Australian War Memorial. The photographic ideology of the officer in command of the MH&IS, Colonel John Treloar, meant that the Section's war photographers were to pursue historical record photography in a distinctive way. Publicity was eschewed, and particular methods were instigated with a view to ensuring comprehensiveness and accuracy.

Sam van der Plank is a History honours student at the University of Melbourne. Having majored in French and History for his Bachelor of Arts undergraduate degree, Sam recently completed his thesis on the photographic activities of the Military History and Information Section (MH&IS) in the Middle East from August 1941 to mid-1942.

Image: Thomas Fisher Tel El Kebir, Egypt. 1941-11. A member of the staff of HQ Ordnance Depot, Australian Army Ordnance Corps, preparing motor vehicle tool kits in the unit tool store; courtesy of Australian War Memorial.


Christian Thompson

BRITTANY WILKINS
Christian Thompson


Brittany Wilkins graduated from the University of Melbourne in 2013 with a Bachelor of Arts with Honours in Art History. Her honours research focused on the photographic self-portraiture of Christian Thompson, outlining and investigating his approach to depicting his own subjectivity with a particular focus on his manipulation of the gaze. The thesis sought to intervene in the existing literature on Thompson by contextualising the artist's work in a broader theoretical framework than it had previously been considered, including a consideration of theories of the gaze, the postcolonial archive, and gender subjectivity/queer theory.

Wilkins is currently a full time employee of the National Gallery of Victoria in the Public Programs department. While currently focussed on the development of programs and exhibitions for young people and families, earlier this year she had the opportunity to coordinate the NGV's suite of programs for Reconciliation and NAIDOC Weeks for 2014.

Image: Christian Thompson Lamenting the Flowers 2012; courtesy the artist and Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi, Melbourne.


CROSSING PATHS WITH VIVIAN MAIER PUBLIC PROGRAMS

A collaboration between CCP and the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions, The University of Melbourne

How the 'selfie' performs across time and place

Vivian Maier

Wednesday 15 October, 6—7.30pm
$5, bookings essential.
Book here >

Self-portraiture is hardly novel, but what distinguishes the 'selfie' in a contemporary context? The 'selfie' is scrutinised from a range of temporal and cultural contexts and emotions.

Chair
Professor Stephanie Trigg
ARC Centre of Excellence for the Centre for the History of Emotions at the University of Melbourne

SPEAKERS
1. Dr Larissa Hjorth
Professor and Deputy Dean in Research & Innovation in the School of Media & Communication, RMIT University

Moving pictures: Camera phones in the field
From disasters to celebrations, camera phone practices play a key role in the abundance of shared images globally. As an integral part of everyday life, camera phone practice offers various lenses and frames into understanding contemporary visuality—especially in terms of the socio-cultural. In this talk I move away from the Western-centric models for contextualising selfies by focusing upon case studies in South Korea.

Larissa Hjorth is an artist, digital ethnographer and Professor in the School of Media & Communication, RMIT. Since 2000, Hjorth has been researching the gendered and socio-cultural dimensions of mobile media and gaming cultures in the Asia–Pacific—these studies are outlined in her books, Mobile Media in the Asia-Pacific (Routledge, 2009), Games — Gaming (Berg, 2010), Online@AsiaPacific (with Michael Arnold, Routledge, 2013), Understanding Social Media (with Sam Hinton, Sage, 2013) and Gaming in Locative, Social and Mobile Media (with Ingrid Richardson, Palgrave, 2014). Hjorth is currently first CI on two Australian Research Council grants—one discovery (Games of Being Mobile) and one linkage with Intel (Locating the Mobile).

2. Dr Adam Nash
Artist, Composer, Performer, Programmer, Writer. Lecturer in Virtual Environments and Digital Media at RMIT University.

Selfie Culture and Digital Affect
Nash will put the recent popularity of 'the selfie' in the context of the contemporary digital eras of globalised art and culture and their affective interaction. He will briefly describe the digital selfie's relationship with art history, its position within contemporary digital networked culture and will offer some ideas towards an aesthetics of digital networks.

Adam Nash is a Melbourne-based artist, composer, programmer, performer and writer in virtual environments, real time 3D and mixed-reality technology. He explores virtual environments as audiovisual performance spaces, data/motion capture sites and generative platforms. Nash has a PhD from the Centre for Animation and Interactive Media, RMIT University. He lectures in Virtual Environments in RMIT University's Game Design degree and is Program Manager of the Digital Media Design degree at RMIT. He is also Director of the Playable Media stream in the Centre for Game Design Research at RMIT.

3. Natalie Hendry
PhD Candidate, Digital Ethnographic Research Centre, RMIT University and the Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre.

Selfies as pedagogy: Young people x mental illness x social media
Young people are seen as OTT and TMI; 'over the top' and exposing 'too much information'. The dangers of exposure—too much skin or emotional posing—are assumed to exemplify a generation's narcissism. Young people themselves however perform a diversity of selfie practices that challenge the self-portrait as exposed narcissism. For young people experiencing mental illness, selfies often make visible the invisibility of their confusing, ambivalent and distressing life experiences.

Natalie Hendry's work explores visual representations of recovery and intimacy through young people's social media use. Working with young people experiencing mental illness, she uses visual, participatory and digital ethnographic methods to co-create understandings of identity, wellbeing and connection. Hendry has a particular interest in working with this cohort to respond to their experiences of incoherence and distress by creating meaning from their everyday representations of recovery and life.

4. Dr Fincina Hopgood
Sessional Lecturer and Researcher in Screen Studies in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne.

Seeing the other and/in the self: The possibilities and limitations of the selfie for empathetic understanding
What is our fascination with the stereotype of the eccentric artist and how do Vivian Maier's self-portraits differ from the selfies of our contemporary moment, given they were (seemingly) not intended for public viewing.

Fincina Hopgood's research interests include the portrayal of mental illness on screen, the emotion of empathy, and the role of film and television in human rights education. She is a freelance film writer and academic, currently writing a book on the portrayal of mental illness in Australian and New Zealand films, based on her PhD research.


Public Program Partners


Image: Vivian Maier New York City, September 10, 1955, Gelatin silver print, 30.5 x 30.5cm, Vivian Maier/Maloof Collection, courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York.


Lost and Found: Ethics, subjecthood and contemporary art

Patrick Pound

Wednesday 22 October, 6—7.30pm
$5, bookings essential.
Book here >

From the posthumous and pseudonymous construction of an artist's identity, to an artistic practice constructed from found images, panellists will discuss the ethics of contemporary art.

Chair Dr Rebecca Coates
Independent curator and lecturer, Art History and Curatorship at the University of Melbourne

SPEAKERS
1. Dr Karen Jones
Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Melbourne

Narrative and Meaning: Can what happens after you die make your life better or worse?
Living a meaningful life requires connection to worthwhile relationships, projects, and values. But a meaningful life is not merely a series of days filled with worthwhile activities: meaningful lives have narrative structure. What happens after you die can alter the narrative structure of your life and render it more or less meaningful.

Karen Jones is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Melbourne. She received her PhD in Philosophy from Cornell University. Prior to coming to the University of Melbourne in 2002, she held positions at Cornell University and the Australian National University. She has written extensively on trust, what it is and when it is justified. She also writes on philosophy of emotion and theories of rationality.

2. Dr Patrick Pound
Senior Lecturer, Photography, Course Director Creative Arts Honours and Master of Creative Arts, Deakin University

Findings — on found photography
Photography is the medium of record. What does the record tell us? People move on from their photographs: leaving behind their records. Shuffling through a vast collection of found photographs we will see if we can find a little meaning or coherence in them. We will take something from the images of others as if on a dare.

This talk will look at what we might take from the great unhinged album of found vernacular snaps. These recently redundant photographic remnants might be, after all, telling records which hold some ideas of their own.

Patrick Pound is a Melbourne-based artist and Senior Lecturer in Photography at Deakin University. He often works with found photographs and other found things. His most recent exhibition in Melbourne was the Gallery of Air, which was an artist's project at the NGV for the exhibition Melbourne Now. This installation featured hundreds of the artist's things and the gallery's things all of which he found to hold an idea of air. Pound's work is held in numerous public gallery collections in Australia and New Zealand including: the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, the Art Gallery of NSW, the Museum of New Zealand and Auckland Art Gallery. He is represented by Stills Gallery, Sydney, Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington, NZ and Melanie Roger Gallery, Auckland, NZ.

Professor Paul Gough
Pro Vice-Chancellor and Vice-President, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University

Banksy—Command, Commission and Control
Paul Gough from RMIT will examine how street artists such as Banksy maintain some element of control over their public art works. Arguably the most renowned 'unknown' street artist in the world, Banksy has had to balance the free availability of his street art with protecting the exploitation of his images by others. This talk focuses on the protracted negotiations between the painter, his 'Office', the publisher and Gough in compiling a book that attempted to evaluate the artist's work.

Gough examines the controls demanded by the painter's agent, the attempts to manage the ready availability of imagery, and the difficulties in seeking the necessary permissions from an artist who deals almost entirely through proxies.

Paul Gough is a painter, broadcaster and writer. He has exhibited globally and is represented in the permanent collections of the Imperial War Museum, London; Canadian War Museum, Ottawa; and National War Memorial, New Zealand. Published widely in cultural history, cultural geography and heritage studies, Gough also has books on war artists, peace gardens and street artist, Banksy.


Public Program Partners


Image: Patrick Pound The addict 2013, Giclee print on rag paper, 45 x 194cm, courtesy the artist and Stills Gallery, Sydney.


Pascal Beausse, Head of Photographic Collections at the Centre National des Arts Plastiques (CNAP) in Paris

Number Three / Knowledge is Power—Two exhibitions curated from the collections of Centre National des Arts Plastiques (CNAP), Paris

Pascal Beausse Lecture

Friday 3 October 2014, 6—8pm
Centre for Contemporary Photography
Gold coin donation, no booking required

Pascal Beausse will speak about two landmark exhibitions curated in Spain from the Centre National des Arts Plastiques (CNAP) Collection in Paris, Número Tres. De la casa a la fábrica at La Virreina - centre de la imatge, Barcelona, 2012 and Savoir c'est pouvoir / Conocimiento es poder / Knowledge is Power at PHotoEspana, Madrid in 2013. These two exhibitions raised issues such as: body, biopolitics, house / factory, representation of labour, globalization, migration and counter-history. Their main subject is the knowledge developed by the body through the experiences of life and work.

An Art Critic and a Curator, Pascal Beausse is currently the Head of Photographic Collections at the Centre National des Arts Plastiques (CNAP) in Paris. He is also Guest Lecturer at HEAD, University of Arts and Design, in Geneva, and researcher in the Curatorial/Knowledge program at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Beausse has been correspondent in Paris for Flash Art from 1998 to 2013. A member of the editorial committee of the journal Critique d'Art, he is also a regular contributor for art journals and magazines such as Art Press, BeauxArts magazine, W-Art. He has published essays, articles, interviews, and catalogues on the work of Maria Thereza Alves, Jimmie Durham, Teresa Margolles, Allan Sekula, Bruno Serralongue, Cécile Hartmann, Thierry Fontaine, Wang Du, among many others.

Recent exhibitions include Propaganda (Fondation Ricard, Paris, 2003); La Cabane (Palais de Tokyo, Paris, 2006); Welcome to Heterotopia!! (Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennial, Tokamachi, 2006); Same Same but Different (Tina B, Prague, 2006); Investigations (Maison Descartes, Amsterdam, 2007); Void Has No Exit (Creative Union, Hiroshima, 2008); The Clearing (International Triennale of Contemporary Art, Prague, 2008); Hiroshima Art Document (Hiroshima, 2010); Numero Tres (La Virreina - centre de la imatge, Barcelona, 2012), Knowledge is Power (PhotoEspaña, Madrid, 2013), The Secret Sea (Onomichi City Museum of Art, Onomichi, 2013), among others.


supporters

Image: Barbara Kruger Untitled 1989. Collection CNAP.


Talking Sievers

Talking Sievers

Wednesday 16 July 2014, 6—8pm
Centre for Contemporary Photography
Price: $10 CCP members (includes a complementary copy of The Sievers Project catalogue), $20 non-members
Limited space, bookings essential.
Book here >

CCP presents an intimate walk-through and discussion of our current exhibition, The Sievers Project, with renowned curator and historian, Professor Helen Ennis, and two of The Sievers Project artists, Jane Brown and Therese Keogh. Join us for a few drinks over thought-provoking discussion of Wolfgang Sievers and the journey Jane Brown and Therese Keogh went on in responding to his practice.

Professor Helen Ennis is one of Australia's leading photography curators, historians and writers. She was formerly Curator of Photography at the National Gallery of Australia (1985-1992). She joined the Australian National University School of Art in 1995 and is Convenor of the Graduate Research program. In 2011 she published her book, Wolfgang Sievers, and in 2014 she became Director of the Centre for Art History and Art Theory at ANU.

Image: Wolfgang Sievers Cocktail Bar at Menzies Hotel, Melbourne, Australia 1965; National Library of Australia, Wolfgang Sievers Photographic Archive.


Architectural Photography, then and now

Talking Sievers

Wednesday 30 July 2014, 6—8pm
Robin Boyd Foundation, Walsh St, South Yarra
Price: $40 non-members, $30 RBF / CCP members
Limited space, bookings essential.
Book here >

The Sievers Project Public Programs at Walsh Street

In collaboration with Centre for Contemporary Photography (CCP), The Robin Boyd Foundation presents a series of discussions on themes inspired by The Sievers Project. Currently exhibiting at CCP, early career artists, working across media from photography through to installation, have responded in diverse ways to renowned Australian photographer Wolfgang Sievers (1913—2007), icon of 20th century Australian photography. In the first session panelists will address changing fashions in architectural photography since Wolfgang Sievers and the second panel will investigate the process of commissioning in architecture, photography and contemporary design.

These sessions will be presented at Walsh Street, the house that architect Robin Boyd designed for his own family in 1957. Now the home of the Robin Boyd Foundation, Walsh Street is an exemplar of modernist Australian architecture.

Architectural Photography, then and now

Architectural photography has changed dramatically since Wolfgang Sievers. A diverse panel, comprising photographer, curator, academic and critic will address not only links between changing fashions in architecture and photography but also the impact of architectural photography on the way buildings are brought into the public imagination.

Chair: Daniel Palmer, Associate Dean, Graduate Research, MADA (Monash University Art Design & Architecture)

John Gollings
Photographer
Renowned architectural photographer, John Gollings specialises in photos of cities, buildings and landscapes often from an aerial perspective. Gollings latest project is "Every high rise on the Queensland Gold Coast". He was co-creative director of the Australian Pavilion at the 12th Venice Architecture Biennale, and recently completed a guidebook to Khmer temples in SouthEast Asia.

Eve Sainsbury
Exhibitions Curator, State Library of Victoria
Eve Sainsbury is responsible for curating the ongoing exhibitions Mirror of the World and The Changing Face of Victoria. In 2011 she curated As Modern as Tomorrow, photographers in post-war Melbourne, the Library's first major exhibition of mid-century photography, which included works from the Wolfgang Sievers collection.

Christine Marie Phillips
Lecturer in the Architecture Program at RMIT University
Christine Phillips is a director of the Melbourne-based practice, OpenHAUS; a lecturer at RMIT University; a freelance writer and co-host of RRR's weekly radio show, 'The Architects'.

Cameron Bruhn
Editorial Director, Architecture Media
In 2010 and 2013 Cameron Bruhn curated Australia's contribution to the London Festival of Architecture. Previously he was editor of Architecture Media publications Artichoke and Landscape Architecture Australia. Bruhn is an active contributor to design culture through writing and editing, as well as participating on award juries and undertaking sessional teaching.

Images (left to right): Wolfgang Sievers Comalco Aluminium Used in the Construction of the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Architect Roy Grounds 1968 (detail), National Library of Australia, Wolfgang Sievers Photographic Archive; John Gollings (detail).


The Nature of Commissioning

Talking Sievers

Wednesday 27 August 2014, 6—8pm
Robin Boyd Foundation, Walsh St, South Yarra
Price: $40 non-members, $30 RBF / CCP members
Limited space, bookings essential.
Book here >

The Sievers Project Public Programs at Walsh Street

In collaboration with Centre for Contemporary Photography (CCP), The Robin Boyd Foundation presents a series of discussions on themes inspired by The Sievers Project. Currently exhibiting at CCP, early career artists, working across media from photography through to installation, have responded in diverse ways to renowned Australian photographer Wolfgang Sievers (1913—2007), icon of 20th century Australian photography. In the first session panelists will address changing fashions in architectural photography since Wolfgang Sievers and the second panel will investigate the process of commissioning in architecture, photography and contemporary design.

These sessions will be presented at Walsh Street, the house that architect Robin Boyd designed for his own family in 1957. Now the home of the Robin Boyd Foundation, Walsh Street is an exemplar of modernist Australian architecture.

Architectural Photography, then and now

Practitioners from a range of disciplines speak about how they approach the process of making work that has been commissioned. Does the transaction between the commissioner and the commissioned vary between art forms? How have these esteemed practitioners engaged with their commissions? Is the tenor of the relationship with the commissioner relevant to the outcome?

Chair: Naomi Cass, CCP Director and co curator with Kyla McFarlane, The Sievers Project

Andrew Maynard
Director, Andrew Maynard Architects (AMA)
Andrew is a Tasmanian architect, living and working in Fitzroy. Andrew Maynard Architects was created to strike a balance between built projects and polemical design studies. The resulting highly crafted built work and socio-political concepts have garnered global recognition and his work has been awarded, published and exhibited throughout the world.

Susan Cohn
Director, Workshop 3000
Susan Cohn is a contemporary jeweller, designer, writer and curator. Her long-standing practice works across the art-craft-design divide, thinking through the implications of technology, social function and user experience, with a key interest in contemporary jewellery as wearable technology. Cohn holds a doctorate degree of Philosophy in Fine Art Theory, is the current artist representative on the Council of Trustees of the National Gallery of Victoria and is represented by Anna Schwartz Gallery, Melbourne and Sydney.

Damien Wright
Founder and Director of Wright Studios / Designer and Timber Craftsman
Damien Wright is an award-winning furniture designer and craftsman. Wright realises his designs through the painstaking use of indigenous Australian hardwood species that are not traditionally used to make furniture. Through extensive research and sensitive cross-cultural collaboration, Wright incorporates into his design philosophy a wealth of knowledge regarding Australian history, politics and land management practices.

Phuong Ngo
Artist
Contemporary visual artist, Phuong Ngo's practice explores the individual and collected identity of the Vietnamese Diaspora through the exploration of history, politics and culture. Lullaby (2014) and selections from Mother Vietnam (2014), currently exhibiting at CCP, are sculptural and photographic works created in response to a single work by Wolfgang Sievers; as well as Sievers' declared interest in the dignity of labour.

Images (left to right): Nic Granleese; John Gollings (detail).


Stalking Sievers

Talking Sievers

Sunday 17 August 2014, 2—3pm
Centre for Contemporary Photography
Free event
Bookings not required.

Artists make work and curators install their work in exhibitions. To some extent the work speaks for itself however, it is always exciting to hear from artists and curators about their motivations, research and technology. On Sunday 17 August, at 2pm CCP presents a special event for Art this Way entitled, Stalking Wolfgang Sievers: with Meredith Turnbull and Cameron Clarke.

Cameron Clarke and Meredith Turnbull will speak on their work in The Sievers Project. Cameron Clarke has followed in Sievers footsteps to some of the industrial clients that Sievers photographed last century. In her intriguing sculptural installation, Meredith Turnbull draws on Sievers connections with Melbourne's design community in the 1950s and 60s, including Gerard Herbst and Frederick Romberg.

Images (left to right): Cameron Clarke Ilo Najdanovski, Ford Motor Company, Geelong 2014, courtesy the artist; Wolfgang Sievers 'Stanhill', Designed by Architect Frederick Romberg, at Queens Road, Melbourne, Victoria 1951 (detail), National Library of Australia, Wolfgang Sievers Photographic Archive; Meredith Turnbull Composition for floor in 7 panels 2014 (detail), Installation view, Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne, Photo: Christian Capurro.


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