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2017 CCP Public Programs

Centre for Contemporary Photography presents an annual series of public lectures.

CCP—pm
Friday October 13, 5pm–7pm

Symposium: The Transit Lounge of Photography and Magic Lantern Performance
Presented by Deakin Motion Lab Centre for Creative Arts Research
Saturday 21 October, 3pm–7:30pm 

An unorthodox flow: A discussion
Curators’ floortalk
Saturday 22 October, 12:45pm–1:45pm

Images flow in an unorthodox manner: online and in museums
Thursday 26 October, 12pm–1pm
Grainger Museum, Gate 13, Royal Parade Parkville

Codes of practice: Indigenous subjects and Indigenous photographers
Thursday 2 November, 6pm–8pm

'A picture tells a thousand words': but whose?
Thursday 9 November, 6pm–8pm

Artist Film Workshop Specimen Screenings
Sunday 6 and Sunday 20 August, 6pm, 2017

Echo Chamber: Emerging Research on Photography
Thursday 13 July, 6pm, 2017

Echo Chamber: Emerging Research on Photography
Thursday 2 March, 6pm, 2017


CCP—pm
Centre for Contemporary Photography
Friday October 13, 5pm—7pm
Visit the gallery after hours and wander through our latest exhibition at your leisure. The perfect night for those who find it difficult to visit CCP during regular opening hours.
Free event, beer and wine from 5pm.

RSVP here

 


Symposium: The Transit Lounge of Photography and Magic Lantern Performance
Presented by Deakin Motion Lab Centre for Creative Arts Research
Centre for Contemporary Photography
Saturday 21 October, 3pm–7:30pm
Bookings required, $10 for non-members,
$5 for CCP members and students
Magic Lantern Performance, 6pm–7.30pm
Gold coin donation for performance only

A symposium on the ever-changing states of photography from the invention of the medium to the digital present.

From the magic lantern to Instagram and 'connected photography' this symposium unpacks a little history of the transmission of images. The Transit Lounge of Photography examines where the medium of record has been and asks: how is it travelling. The Transit Lounge of Photography is all about making connections with photographic images and reading their vapor trails. Presenting a series of projections on images and ideas in the share-house of photography. Join us for an afternoon looking through photographs and at photography ending in a live magic lantern show in the evening.

Coordinated by Patrick Pound (Deakin Motion Lab Centre for Creative Arts Research) and the Centre for Contemporary Photography.

Read more, and book here

Image: found image: collection of Patrick Pound


An unorthodox flow: A discussion
Curators’ floortalk
Centre for Contemporary Photography
Sunday 22 October, 12:45pm–1:45pm
free event, no bookings required

Join the curators of An unorthodox flow of images, Naomi Cass and Pippa Milne, for a back-and-forth discussion of the intricate connections and interlacing of exhibited images through formal, conceptual and material links. Commencing with Australia’s first press photograph, 150 images unfurl in flowing, a-historical sequences throughout the gallery, drawing upon the photographic image in its many forms. We invite you to join the discussion, to agree or disagree, and to share with us your own flow of images.

 


Images flow in an unorthodox manner: online and in museums
Grainger Museum, Gate 13, Royal Parade Parkville
Thursday 26 October, 12pm—1pm
free event, bookings required

In an era of 'tumbling' images, Naomi Cass will address two exhibitions that use photography in unorthodox ways. Grainger Photographed: Public Facades and Intimate Spaces and An unorthodox flow of images at Center for Contemporary Photography both engage with visual culture, finding new meanings through a historical juxtapositions, more akin to how people use photography in a contemporary setting.

Book here

 


Codes of practice: Indigenous subjects and Indigenous photographers
Centre for Contemporary Photography
Thursday 2 November, 6pm–8pm
Chair: Stephen Gilchrist
free event, rsvp for seating: rsvp@ccp.org.au

This panel discussion, chaired by Stephen Gilchrist, will consider the ethical and cultural codes of practice when working with Indigenous subjects and photographers, the representation of Indigenous communities, the legacy of images of deceased people, the politics of witness and our responsibilities as curators and audience. In part this discussion is inspired by Lisa Bellear's Proposed code of ethics - photographing Indigenous Australians which was compiled for her unfinished PhD thesis and published in the catalogue for Closer to you: The Lisa Bellear Picture Show at the Koorie Heritage Trust in 2016. Speakers include Lisa Hilli, Kirsten Lyttle, Léuli Eshrāghi, Kimberley Moulton and Maree Clarke. 

Chair

Stephen Gilchrist
Belonging to the Yamatji people of northwest Western Australia, Stephen Gilchrist is Associate Lecturer of Indigenous Art in the Department of Art History at the University of Sydney where he is also a PhD candidate. He is a lecturer, writer and curator who has held curatorial appointments within the Indigenous Art Departments of the National Gallery of Australia and the National Gallery of Victoria. He has held Curatorial Fellowships at the British Museum (2008), the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College (2011-2013) and was the Visiting Australian Studies Curator at the Harvard Art Museums, Harvard University (2013-2016).

Speakers

Lisa Hilli
Lisa Hilli is a contemporary artist living in Narrm (Melbourne) Australia. Born in Rabaul, Lisa is a descendent of the Tolai or Gunantuna people of Papua New Guinea. She completed a MFA by Research degree at RMIT University. Her work has been presented nationally and internationally in Brussels, Amsterdam and Yogyakarta. She has been an artist in residence at the Australian Tapestry Workshop and was awarded a photographic prize for the Centre for Contemporary Photography Salon exhibition in 2016. Lisa is currently undertaking a research project within Australian museums and archives through a Museums Victoria 1854 Scholarship.

Kirsten Lyttle
Kirsten Lyttle is a Māori-Australian artist, academic and doctoral candidate (completing in 2018). Her Iwi (tribe) is Waikato, tribal affiliation is Ngāti Tahinga, Tainui A Whiro. Trained as a photographer (Fine Art) at RMIT University, in 2013 she was awarded a Master of Fine Art (RMIT University). She is currently completing her PhD at Deakin University and teaching photography in the School of Community and Creative Arts, Deakin University.

Kirsten has exhibited widely in Australia and internationally including, Indonesian Contemporary Art Network Yogyakarta (Indonesia), Galleria 291 Est. Rome (Italy), and Oedipus Rex Gallery Auckland (New Zealand). In 2016 was a finalist in the 2016 Bowness Photography Prize (Monash Gallery of Art). She was the 2015 indigenous artist in residence as part of the RMIT/University of Lethbridge, Indigenous Residency Gushul Studio, Blairmore, Canada.

Léuli Eshrāghi
Léuli Māzyār Lunaʻi Eshrāghi (Sāmoan, Persian and other ancestries) is an uninvited guest in Narrm in unceded Kulin Nation territory, and a PhD candidate at Monash University Art Design Architecture (MADA). His work centers on ceremonial-political renewal, languages, embodied futures, diasporic and local indigeneities. He serves on the board of Aboriginal Curatorial Collective | Collectif des commissaires autochtones (Canada), editorial advisory panel for Broadsheet (Australia), and Pacific Advisory Group for Melbourne Museum.

Kimberley Moulton
Kimberley Moulton is a Yorta-Yorta woman, curator and writer and is the Senior Curator of South Eastern Aboriginal Collections for Museums Victoria. Her practice looks at the intersection of contemporary First Peoples art and cultural material in museums with a focus on community access and collections. Kimberley has an independent curatorial practice and her most recent co-curated show is Next Matriarch, with TARNATHI Festival and ACE Open Adelaide.
Kimberley is an alumni of National Gallery Australia Wesfarmers Indigenous Leadership Program, the 2016 NGA International curatorial fellow USA, and alumni of British Council Accelerate Program UK. Kimberley was a Victorian curator for the First Nations Exchange Program Venice Biennale 2017.

Maree Clarke
Maree Clarke, a Mutti Mutti, Yorta Yorta, BoonWurrung woman from Mildura in northwest Victoria, is a multi disciplinary artist living and working in Melbourne.
Maree Clarke is a pivotal figure in the reclamation of southeast Australian Aboriginal art practices, reviving elements of Aboriginal culture that were lost over the period of colonisation. Maree’s continuing desire to affirm and reconnect with her cultural heritage has seen her revification of the traditional possum skin cloaks, together with the production of contemporary designs of kangaroo teeth necklaces, and string headbands adorned with kangaroo teeth and echidna quills.
Maree Clarke’s multi media installations of photography, painting and sculpture further explore the rituals and ceremonies of her ancestors.

Image: Lisa Bellear The Black GST Protest at Camp Sovereignty 2006, courtesy Lisa Bellear Collection, Koorie Heritage Trust and John Stewart.


'A picture tells a thousand words': but whose?
Thursday 9 November, 6pm–8pm
Free event, rsvp for seating: rsvp@ccp.org.au
An in conversation with CCP Curator, Pippa Milne and Clare Wright, presenter of Radio National's podcast Shooting the Past.
Followed by 6 writers, artists, curators and collectors discussing their favourite work from An unorthodox flow of images.

About Dr Clare Wright

Dr Clare Wright is an award-winning historian and author who has worked as an academic, political speechwriter, historical consultant and radio and television broadcaster. Clare’s most recent book, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, won the 2014 Stella Prize and the 2014 NIB Award for Literature and was shortlisted for the Prime Minister’s, WA Premier’s and Queensland Literary Awards, the NSW Premier’s History Awards the Victorian Community History Awards and longlisted for a Walkley Award. The screen rights to TFROE have been bought by Ruby Entertainment, producers of The Secret River, for a 8-part television drama series. TFROE is published in a Young Adult edition as We Are The Rebels, which was a Children’s Book Council of Australia Notable Book for 2016.

Clare's essays and journalism have been published in Griffith Review, Meanjin, Overland, The AgeThe GuardianThe Conversation, Crikey. Clare wrote and presented the ABC TV documentary Utopia Girls: How Women Won the Vote and created and co-wrote the ABC TV series The War That Changed Us, which won the 2015 ATOM award for Best Docudrama and was nominated for a Logie in 2015 for Most Outstanding Factual Program. Clare is the writer/presenter of a radio history series/podcast, Shooting the Past, which is broadcast on Radio National. In 2016, Clare was the recipient of the Alice Literary Award, presented by the Australian Society for Women Writers to “an Australian woman who by her written work has made a distinguished and long-term contribution to Australian literature.” 

Clare is a Director on The Board of the Wheeler Centre for Books, Writing and Ideas. Clare is currently an Associate Professor in History and ARC Future Fellow at La Trobe University. Clare lives in Melbourne with her husband, furniture designer/maker Damien Wright, their three children and too many pets.


Artist film workshop Specimen Screenings:

Program 1:
10 films from the Artist Film Workshop
Sunday 6 August, 6pm

Centre for Contemporary Photography
Gold-coin donation, no bookings required.

Hanna Chetwin, Soda, 2017, 16mm, 6mins – digital sound
Richard Tuohy, Pancoran, 2017, 16mm, 9mins – digital sound
Giles Fielke, Internal and External Objects, 2017,16mm, 7mins – digital sound
Zi-Yun Lam, Travel Film, 16mm, 3mins – digital sound
Madeleine Martiniello, Tomato Day, 2016, 16mm, 6mins – digital sound
Callum Ross-Thomson, Fire Mountain, 16mm, 10mins – digital sound
Lucas Haynes, Shoplifting, 16mm, 2mins – digital sound
Sabina Maselli, untitled, 16mm, 5mins – digital sound
Olivia Koh, frozen spit, digital video, 10mins – digital sound
Nina Gilbert, The Image Possibility, digital video, 8mins 5secs – digital sound

Program 2:
I Walked With A Zombie
Sunday 20 August, 6pm

Centre for Contemporary Photography
Gold-coin donation, no bookings required.

Jacques Tourneur, I Walked With A Zombie, 1943, 16mm, 69mins (print courtesy NFSA)
Introduced by John Flaus and with a reading from Ralph de Boissière’s Calypso Isle + guests



Echo Chamber: Emerging research on photography


Thursday 13 July, 6pm
Centre for Contemporary Photography
Gold-coin donation, no bookings required.

CCP's Echo Chamber represents a series of occasional, ongoing public programs showcasing current emerging research in all areas of photography, including historical research, technology, communications and contemporary discussion.
Applications to present research for future Echo Chamber public programs are welcome.

CHAIR

MICHELLE MOUNTAIN
Program Manager, Centre for Contemporary Photography

SPEAKERS

Rohan Hutchinson
The Arctic, climate and an artist’s response

The high Arctic gives the first sign of what’s to come in an uncertain future. Hutchinson was stationed in the Arctic during February and March of 2017 with the purpose of analysing the global repercussions of climate change and creating a body of work in response to this. In this talk, Hutchinson’s focus is on the research behind his upcoming body of work, including the issue of climate change, how it is affecting the Arctic landscape, and what role an artist can play in raising awareness of this. His research looks at a selection of photographic artists who have created work in response to natural and man made disasters, ranging from traditional large format landscape work to alternative darkroom processes and mixed media installations.

Rohan Hutchinson is a Melbourne based photographic artist whose large format photographic work questions the transformation of space and our relationship with the environment. He has participated in artist residency programs at Lethbridge University, Alberta, Canada (2014) and the Centre for Art and Architecture Kanazawa, Japan (2012) and has conducted research trips to China, Alaska and the Arctic. Hutchinson has had solo exhibitions locally and internationally, including at Strange Neighbour Gallery, Perth Centre for Photography, Queensland Centre for Photography, Kanazawa Art Port, Colour Factory, Flinders Lane Gallery (Upstairs) and Seventh Art Space. In addition to exhibiting his works, Hutchinson has also created several artist books.

Image: Rohan Hutchinson Untitled 2017, courtesy the artist.

 

 

Charmaine Toh
Reading the Photographic Archive

This talk will look at the status of the historical photographic archive in Singapore, its relationship with power and its subsequent potential for writing history. Early photographic history in Singapore has been largely determined by the colonial archive, that is, images produced and circulated for British consumption. From the late 19th century to early 20th century, studios such as GR Lambert & Co. and Sachtler & Co., and photographers like John Thomson, created an archive of ethnographic types and views of Southeast Asia, providing the first impression of the region for the European viewers. This visual imagination persisted through the 20th century and laid out the conventions by which Southeast Asia has since been represented. In other words, it is not only an archive of colonial power and desires, but also a visual colonization of the landscapes of the region. The paper concludes by highlighting the difficulties of using such archival material, paying particular attention to the issues with aesthetics and nostalgia.

Charmaine Toh is a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne researching pictorial photography from Singapore. She is also Curator at National Gallery Singapore; recent exhibitions included Danh VoTang Da Wu: Earth Work 1979 and Siapa Nama Kamu: Art in Singapore since the 19th century. Previously, she was the Programme Director at Objectifs Centre for Photography and Film where she played a pivotal role in revitalising the gallery programme. Charmaine co-curated the 2013 Singapore Biennale.

Image: GR Lambert & Co. Siamese Nurse c.1880, Collection of National Museum of Singapore.

 

Kelvin Lau
Exploring the mental health of young people from a migrant background using photo-interviewing

“Photo-interviewing” is a qualitative social research method whereby participants create photographs around a selected issue and discuss their meaning within an interview setting.  Kelvin Lau utilized photo-interviewing in his research project to investigate how young people from a culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) migrant background identified, explained, and responded to subjective experiences of mental distress and ill-health.
He will discuss how the engagement of photo-interviewing by fifteen young people from a CALD migrant background created opportunities in his research for locating and inductively interpreting the meaning of their mentally distressing experiences, and for exploring the barriers they encountered in seeking support for these distress experiences.

Kelvin Lau is a PhD student at the Department of General Practice, University of Melbourne. He is scheduled to complete his PhD research project in August 2017.  He also works as a GP at Headspace Collingwood, a mental health support service for young people between 14 and 25 years of age.

Image: Untitled by “Ayu” 2015 (artist’s name withheld).
Artists have been given pseudonyms to maintain the privacy of research participants.

 


Echo Chamber: Emerging research on photography


Thursday 2 March, 6pm
Centre for Contemporary Photography
Gold-coin donation, no bookings required.

CCP's Echo Chamber represents a series of occasional, ongoing public programs showcasing current emerging research in all areas of photography, including historical research, technology, communications and contemporary discussion.

Applications to present research for future Echo Chamber public programs are welcome.

Chair

MICHELLE MOUNTAIN
Program Manager, Centre for Contemporary Photography

Speakers

Kate Golding

Kate Golding
The camera obscura: past, present, future

A precursor to photography as we know it today, the camera obscura is a naturally occurring optical phenomenon. Through her research, Golding has examined historical and contemporary applications of this “darkened chamber” from astronomical observation, seaside recreation, scientific and military uses through to art making. This research has extended to experimentations with the creation of several camera obscura both fixed and portable. However, the camera obscura is more than just a photographic apparatus or mechanical device, it can be an idea, a metaphor. French philosopher, Sarah Kofman has examined how Marx, Freud and Nietzsche all made use of the camera obscura as metaphor in their writing. This presentation will discuss both this history and philosophy. Golding will propose ways in which the camera obscura, as experiential device, might be used to disrupt perception.

Kate Golding is an artist based in Narrm Melbourne who utilises photographic processes to examine colonisation while reflecting critically on her own settler heritage. Currently undertaking a Master of Fine Arts by Research degree at the Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne, her research project focuses on First Nation sovereignty, the memorialisation of Captain Cook and the creation of counter-monuments. Golding has exhibited both nationally and internationally and last year was the winner of the 2016 Linden Postcard Show and the Best Work by a CCP Member award at the 2016 CCP Salon.

Image credit: Kate Golding, Camera obscura (install detail), 2016, courtesy the artist.


Sophia Cai

Sophia Cai
In My Skin: Contemporary Chinese Photography

In this talk, emerging curator and arts writer Sophia Cai will examine the use of the body in Chinese contemporary photography. Drawing on the works of young artists born in the 1970s and 1980s, who have all grown up without direct experience of socialism and the Cultural Revolution, this talk will examine how social, economic and political changes are registered through personal experiences and identity. The focus on the corporeal through the lens of photography offers the artists a means to mediate directly on contemporary life and issues, while anchored in personal experience and intimacy. While not always overtly political in nature, the primacy of the body works can be understood against a broader backdrop of China’s recent history and developments, particularly in relation to a shift from collectivism to individualism.

Sophia Cai is an emerging curator and arts writer with a particular interest in Asian art history and craft-based contemporary art practices. She completed a Masters in History of Art at the Courtauld Institute of Art in 2014 specialising in contemporary Chinese art post-1979, and previously graduated from the Australian National University with a First-Class Honours degree in Art History and Curatorship. As an independent curator, Sophia has worked on exhibitions in Sydney and Melbourne including Secret Garden at Schoolhouse Studios (2015), Some words are just between us at Firstdraft (2016) and Closing the Distance at Bundoora Homestead Art Centre (2017).

Image credit: Pixy Liao, Play Station, 2013, courtesy the artist.


Roderick Grant

Roderick Grant
Critical Infrastructure: Landscape, Intention and Intervention

What we see as the outward visual denotation of urban infrastructure is not always connected directly to what it might connote as a symbol, an index, or as an embodiment of policy, need, capital and spatial practice. The objective of this new research and scholarship is to bring to light the disjunctions and contradictions in the visual coherence of our urban infrastructure, and to reveal how we might begin to analyze its meaning and re-assess the significance of its critical adaptation, and intentional evolution. The core aspects of infrastructure that this investigation will address begin with energy – what can be understood by their critically assessing the overlap, integration and opposition of infrastructure with seen and unseen aspects of governance.

Roderick Grant is Chair + Associate Professor of Graphic Design at OCAD University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Before joining OCAD University in the Fall of 2009, Roderick was Assistant Professor of Design, at the American University of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates. He holds an MFA in Graphic Design from the Rhode Island School of Design, and a BA in Urban Studies from New College of Florida. Roderick’s design practice – simonjames – a partnership with his wife Michelle Grant, focuses on small architectural and editorial projects, design competitions, and speculative design work. He is currently a Visiting Researcher at Swinburne University in Melbourne, Australia for the 2016/17 academic year, initiating a longer-term research project on urban infrastructure, photojournalistic representation and visual narrative construction.

Image credit: Roderick Grant, Brunswick Terminal Station, 2016, courtesy the artist.



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