Contributors

Issue 4 2012

Andy Adams is an independent web producer + photo publisher whose work blends aspects of digital communication, online audience engagement, and web-based creative collaboration to explore contemporary ideas in photography. Recent projects include The Future of Photobooks, a cross-blog conversation that considered the impact of internet culture on photographic production, exhibition and distribution and 100 Portraits - 100 Photographers, a digital exhibition of contemporary portraiture that has shown at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Australian Centre for Photography and numerous festivals in the U.S. and abroad. In his spare time he publishes FlakPhoto.com, an online art space that promotes the discovery of artists, bookmakers and photo organizations from around the world.
www.andyadamsphoto.com

Maggie Finch is Assistant Curator, Photography at the National Gallery of Victoria. She has written on historical and contemporary photography, and recent curatorial projects include Looking at Looking: The Photographic Gaze and Endless Present: Robert Rooney and Conceptual Art at the NGV. She is currently a coordinating curator of the AGNSW touring exhibition The Mad Square: Modernity in German Art 1910–1937.

Helen Frajman is an independent curator and editor of photography and Director of Melbourne’s M.33. Recent M33 publishing projects include I Keep Mine Hidden: Drew Pettifer; Blush (Photographs 1988-2010): Janina Green; Peter Milne: Beautiful Lies: Notes Towards A History Of Australia and Parádeisos: Christopher Koller, and the 3 Book Series, featuring Jane Burton, Darren Sylvester and Simon Terrill. Recent editing projects include: Notes from the Mississippi Delta by Nathan Miller (Wild Rabbit, Melbourne, 2008) and 113 Photographs/Ten Series by Matthew Sleeth (Aperture, New York, 2007). www.m33.net.au

Natalie King is an independent curator, writer and broadcaster, and guest curator of Up Close: Carol Jerrems with Larry Clark, Nan Goldin and William Yang at Heide Museum of Modern Art in July - October 2010. She is Director of Utopia@Asialink, a roving, multilateral platform for regional engagement that is flexible, responsive and generative. Utopia is a network of cities that converse and collaborate including Melbourne, Tokyo, Singapore, Seoul and New Delhi. www.asialink.unimelb.edu.au/our_work/arts/utopia

Jennifer Mills is the author of the novels Gone (UQP, 2011) and The Diamond Anchor (UQP, 2009). A collection of her short stories The Rest is Weight will be published by UQP in 2012. She was the winner of the 2008 Marian Eldridge Award for Young Emerging Women Writers, the Pacific Region of the 2008–9 Commonwealth Short Story Competition, and the 2008 Northern Territory Literary Awards: Best Short Story. Her work has appeared in Meanjin, Hecate, Overland, Heat, the Griffith Review, Best Australian Stories, and New Australian Stories, and she is a regular contributor to New Matilda and Overland. She lives in South Australia. www.jenjen.com.au

Jennifer Phipps is an independent art historian, art commentator and curator of Australian art.

Amy Stein is a photographer and teacher based in New York City. Her work explores our evolving isolation from community, culture and the environment. She has been exhibited nationally and internationally and her work is featured in many private and public collections such as the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, the Nevada Museum of Art, the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art and the George Eastman House Photography Collection. Amy was raised in Washington, DC, and Karachi, Pakistan. She holds a BS in Political Science from James Madison University and a MS in Political Science from the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. In 2006, Amy received her MFA in photography from the School of Visual Arts in New York. Stein teaches photography at Parsons The New School for Design and the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Amy is represented by Robert Koch Gallery in San Francisco and ClampArt in New York. www.amysteinphoto.com

Issue 3 2009

Naomi Cass, Director of the Centre for Contemporary Photography (CCP), curator and writer, has worked in the fields of contemporary art, craft, design and music since completing her honours degree at the University of Melbourne. In 2005 she oversaw relocation of the CCP, now in its 22nd year, to purpose designed premises.

Dr Isobel Crombie has worked as a Curator of Photography since 1979. She began her career at the National Gallery of Australia and, since 1988, has been Senior Curator, Photography, National Gallery of Victoria. She regularly curates exhibitions on the history of Australian and International photography and has published over sixty articles and books on aspects of the medium. Recent publications include Body Culture: Max Dupain, Photography and Australian Culture, 1919-1939, 2004; Shashin: Nineteenth-century Japanese studio photography, 2005; Light Sensitive: Contemporary Australia photography from the Loti Smorgon Fund, 2006; Body Language: Contemporary Chinese photography, 2008 and Re-view: 170 Years of Photography, 2009.

Tara Gilbee is a Victorian photomedia artist. She is also a curatorial collaborator in the arts group <the space in between> which explores the interstitial relations of art to its environment and within collaborative practice. Tara has worked with national and international artists across various practices. She recently toured the group exhibition The Space in Between: Book Project to a number of regional galleries in Australia. Tara has held residencies at CAMAC, France, in 2004 and Raw Space, Queensland 2005. She has participated in Arts Victoria funding panels and has published reviews in Real Time and UN Magazine. Her work is held in public and private collections.

Philip Goldswain is a lecturer in architecture at the University of Western Australia. With Prof William Taylor he is editor of An Everyday Transience: The Urban Imaginary of John Joseph Dwyer (UWA Publishing, forthcoming, 2010) and an exhibition of the same title for FotoFreo 2010. He is a contributing editor for the Australian Institute of Architect’s journal Architecture Australia, a former editor of The Architect (WA) and has written extensively on the contemporary built environment. A PhD candidate at The University of Melbourne, his research is investigating the visual depiction of boom towns with an emphasis on Kalgoorlie, Western Australia.

Dr Adrian Martin is Senior Research Fellow, Monash University, an internationally-known film critic, and Co-Editor of the online magazine Rouge (www.rouge.com.au). Since 1979, Adrian has combined work as a professional writer and film critic with a university career. He was film reviewer for The Age between 1995 and 2006. For his numerous books, essays and public lectures he has won the Byron Kennedy Award (Australian Film Institute) and the Pascall Prize for Critical Writing, and his PhD on film style won the Mollie Holman Award. He is the author of four books and hundreds of essays on film, art, television, literature, music, popular and avant-garde culture.

Anna MacDonald is an Associate Curator at the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art (ACCA), Melbourne. She was curator of Intimacy 2008. Other recent projects include co-ordination of The Enlightenments, the visual arts program of the Edinburgh International Festival in 2009 and Tacita Dean at ACCA, also in 2009.

Dr Kyla McFarlane is a writer, editor and Assistant Curator - Exhibitions at Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne. Kyla has written on contemporary visual art in Australia and New Zealand since 1996, with a particular emphasis on photography. She has published numerous catalogue essays, articles, book chapters and reviews. Kyla’s curatorial projects at Monash University Museum of Art include Photographer Unknown, 2009; The Ecologies Project, with Geraldine Barlow, 2008 and The Line Between Us: The Maternal Relation in Contemporary Photography, 2005. Kyla holds a PhD in visual culture from Monash University, which focuses on the relationship between contemporary photography, feminism and psychoanalysis. She has also worked as a pictorial editor at The Age and the New Zealand Herald.

Glenn Pilkington is a Perth based curator and visual artist. Currently at the Art Gallery of Western Australia (AGWA) in the role of Curator of Indigenous Objects and Photography, Glenn has worked in the Indigenous visual arts sector for the last six years. Prior to this Glenn worked as an Indigenous Arts Development Manager at artsource: the artist’s foundation of WA, delivering development opportunities to Indigenous artists throughout Western Australia. Glenn has a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree (Printmaking) from the School of Contemporary Art, Edith Cowan University and has exhibited in exhibition such as Innovators 3, 2008 Linden Centre for Contemporary Arts, Melbourne; the 25th Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin, and the Xstrata Coal Emerging Indigenous Art Award, GoMA Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, all in 2008. As an artist and curator Glenn has a very strong interest in contemporary race politics and contemporary Indigenous Identity.

Dr Damian Skinner is an art historian and curator who lives in Gisborne, New Zealand. He has published a number of books on Maori art, including Ihenga: Te Haerenga Hou - The Evolution of Maori Carving in the Twentieth Century, Reed, 2007; The Carver and the Artist: Maori Art in the Twentieth Century, Auckland University Press, 2008, and he is currently working on a history of the Maori carved meeting house. He has also written about New Zealand modernist photographers Steve Rumsey and Ans Westra, and is writing a chapter about Brian Brake’s photographs of Maori art for a book being published by Te Papa Press in 2010. His most recent book is Cone Ten Down: Studio Pottery in New Zealand, 1945-1980, Bateman, 2009.

Issue 2 2009

Ulanda Blair is a curator, arts project manager and arts writer, and Artistic Program Manager at Next Wave. Ulanda manages the Next Wave Festival’s keynote projects, as well as the organisation’s professional development program for artists, Kickstart. Prior to Next Wave Ulanda was Gallery Coordinator at Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces, where she worked from 2004 – 2007. In addition to writing numerous catalogue essays for local and international exhibitions, Ulanda’s writing has appeared in Art & Australia, Art World,Artlink, Eyeline, Flash, Green Pages and un Magazine. In 2008 she undertook a curatorial research trip to Japan, China and Singapore, which was supported through the Australia Council’s RUN_WAY program and the Harold Mitchell Foundation. Ulanda is also a member of the National Gallery of Victoria’s Youth Access Committee.

Naomi Cass, Director of the Centre for Contemporary Photography (CCP), curator and writer, has worked in the fields of contemporary art, craft, design and music since completing her honours degree at the University of Melbourne. In 2005 she oversaw relocation of the CCP, now in its 22nd year, to purpose designed premises.

Ross Coulter is a Melbourne based visual artist. He completed a Bachelor of Fine Art with Honours at the Victorian College of the Arts in 2007. In 2009 he also featured as a dancer in the Lucy Guerin Inc productionUntrained. Recent exhibitions include, in 2008: Fuck Your Heroes, West Space, Melbourne; Worlds End, Carlton Hotel, Melbourne; Man Running… Centre for Contemporary Photography, Fitzroy; Play Heads, Alliance Française Gallery, St Kilda; Mono Brow, Hell Gallery, Richmond; Contemporary Australian Video Screening Institute of Contemporary Art, London, all 2008; National Graduation Exhibition Federation Square, Melbourne; Camera Obscura, TCB Gallery, Melbourne; Melbourne Operatic, Te Tuhi, Auckland, New Zealand and Loop, Melbourne; Slide, Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces, Melbourne and the Experimental & Conceptual Shorts Program, Melbourne International Film Festival. Ross has received several awards and grants, including the City of Melbourne Arts Project Grant in 2008, the Orloff Family Charitable Trust Scholarship and the Alliance Française Award in 2007; the National Gallery of Victoria Trustees Award in 2006 and the Stella Dilger Encouragement Award in 2005. While working at Channel 31 in the mid 90s, he was awarded ‘Best TV Entertainment’ three times for Richmond 3121 Oh! by the Community Broadcasting Association of Australia.

Linda Daley teaches literary studies and communication studies in the School of Media and Communication at RMIT University in Melbourne where she is a senior lecturer. She has also worked as a journalist, editor and secondary teacher in Melbourne and country Victoria. Her research interests focus on indigenous visual culture and production, literary philosophy, and the sociology of literature. Linda holds a PhD from Monash University in contemporary European philosophy.

Bec Dean, curator, writer and artist, is currently Associate Director of Performance Space, Sydney. Selected recent curatorial projects include Trace Elements: Spirit and Memory in Japanese and Australian Photomedia, (with Shihoko Iida) Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery, Tokyo, 2008 and Performance Space, Sydney, 2009; Girl Parade, Australian Centre for Photography (ACP), Sydney, 2007; Paul Knight: Don’t Be Something Strong, ACP, Sydney, 2006; Mirror Worlds: Contemporary Video from Asia (with Zoe Butt) ACP, Sydney, 2005; Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane 2006 and Auckland Festival 2007. Recent commissioning projects includeECR by Marley Dawson & Chris Hanrahan, Performance Space, Sydney, 2008 and Portable Cenotaph by Sussi Porsborg, Performance Space, Sydney, 2008. Recent publications include the Column 2: 2008 Biennale of Sydney Critical Response, Artspace, Sydney, 2008; ‘Raquel Ormella: Landscape and Complexity’, ArtlinkAugust 2008 and ‘Deborah Kelly’, Broadsheet 37.3 2008.

Kyla McFarlane is a writer, editor and Assistant Curator - Exhibitions at Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne. Kyla has written on contemporary visual art in Australia and New Zealand since 1996, with a particular emphasis on photography. She has published numerous catalogue essays, articles, book chapters and reviews. Kyla’s curatorial projects at Monash University Museum of Art include The Ecologies Project, with Geraldine Barlow, 2008 and The Line Between Us: The Maternal Relation in Contemporary Photography, 2005. Kyla holds a PhD in visual culture from Monash University which focuses on the relationship between contemporary photography, feminism and psychoanalysis. She has also worked as a pictorial editor at The Age and the New Zealand Herald.

Arlo Mountford is a Melbourne based artist, who has exhibited regularly since completing a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Victorian College of the Arts, Melbourne in 2002. In 2003 he took up a studio residency at Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces. Arlo has been included in numerous group exhibitions including Best of Discovery, ShContemporary, Asia Pacific Contemporary Art Fair, Shanghai, 2008; Contemporary Australia: Optimism, Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, 2008; Order and Dissent: Works From the Heide Collection, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, 2008 and 21st Century Modern, the Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 2006. Arlo’s most recent solo exhibitions have been at Grantpirrie, Sydney, 2009; Conical Inc. Melbourne, 2008 and Gertrude Contemporary Art Spaces, Melbourne, 2007. Arlo was awarded the ABN AMRO Emerging Artist Award in 2007 and has recently returned from a residency at the Frank Mohr Institute, Groningen, Netherlands. Arlo exhibits regularly in both artist run and public galleries nationally and internationally.

Phip Murray is a Melbourne based artist and writer who is currently the Director of West Space ARI. Her previous employment includes lecturing in contemporary art history and theory at Swinburne and RMIT universities, and working for the Next Wave Festival for which she helped create the artist-run initiative exhibition Containers Village in 2006 as well as the interdisciplinary Nightclub projects in 2008. Phip has completed a Masters degree through RMIT’s Media Arts department and also studied Arts/Law at the University of Melbourne. She is a Board and Editorial Committee member of the independent contemporary art journal un Magazine, as well as a board member of the Georges Mora Foundation. Phip writes often about art, with recent projects including writing the audio guides for the Salvadaor Dali­ and John Brack exhibitions at the National Gallery of Victoria, a series of articles for Photofile, and taking on the role of editor for the next issue of un Magazine. She also works with her Dad on the family cattle farm one day per week.

Damian Smith is a Melbourne based curator and writer. He is currently Curator of the Maroondah Art Gallery and Vice-president of the Public Galleries Association of Victoria. He has been a guest curator for institutions including the National Gallery of Victoria and Heide Museum of Modern Art. Major projects include, with Kendrah Morgan, the survey exhibition Unmasked: Sidney Nolan and Ned Kelly 1950-1990, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, 2007 and a monograph, Mike Nicholls: A Work in Progress, 2007. He has written extensively on contemporary Australian and Chinese art including essays for the Guangdong Museum, China and Lingnan University, Hong Kong.

Christos Tsiolkas is the author of four novels: Loaded, which was made into the feature film Head OnThe Jesus Man and Dead Europe, which won the 2006 Age Fiction Prize and the 2006 Melbourne Best Writing Award. He has been awarded the 2009 Commonwealth Writer’s Prize for the Best Book and shortlisted for the 2009 Miles Franklin Literary Award and ALS Gold Medal for his latest novel, The Slap. He wrote the collaborative dialogue Jump Cuts: An Autobiography with Sasha Soldatow and, as an artist, has also collaborated with photographer Zoe Ali on a series of exhibitions dealing with refuge and exile: Destination Unknown 1, 2 & 3. One of his more recent plays, Non Parlo di Salo, co-written with Spiro Economopoulos, is based on the censoring of director-poet Pier Paolo Pasolini’s last film, Salo. He lives in Melbourne.

Meredith Turnbull is a Melbourne based artist, writer and curator.  She completed a Bachelor of Arts with Honours in Art History from Latrobe University in 2000 followed later by a Bachelor of Fine Art from RMIT University in 2005.  She was editor of the online magazine ACCAMag between 2004 and 2005 and Project Manager/Assistant to the Artistic Director at ACCA from 2003-5. Recent exhibitions include Folded curated by Kyla McFarlane, Monash Art and Design Faculty Gallery, Caulfield; De Architectura, curated by Kirsten Rann, Level 17 Artspace, Victoria University, Melbourne; Transmission, Slide, Gertrude Street Contemporary Art Spaces, Melbourne; I Thought That Love Was Science Fiction, TCB art inc, Melbourne, 2008; Happiness is a Complex Form, The Narrows, Melbourne; AO, Peloton, Sydney, 2007 and Selekta, Westspace, Melbourne, 2006. Curatorial projects include Once More with Feeling, VCA Gallery, Melbourne, 2009, World’s End, Carlton Hotel and Studios, Melbourne, 2008 and Zonal Marx, VCA Gallery, Melbourne, 2007. Meredith is currently a member of the Next Wave Festival’s Curatorial Advisory Committee and Gallery Manager/Curator of the VCA Margaret Lawrence Gallery.

Issue 1 2009

Geoffrey Batchen teaches the history of photography at The Graduate Centre of the City University of New York. His books include Burning with Desire: The Conception of Photography, The MIT Press, 1997; Each Wild Idea: Writing, Photography, History, The MIT Press, 2001; Forget Me Not: Photography and Remembrance, Van Gogh Museum & Princeton Architectural Press, 2004; and William Henry Fox Talbot, Phaidon, 2008.

Naomi Cass, Director of the Centre for Contemporary Photography (CCP), curator and writer, has worked in the fields of contemporary art, craft, design and music since completing her honours degree at the University of Melbourne. In 2005 she oversaw relocation of the CCP, now in its 22nd year, to purpose designed premises.

Anne Ferran came to prominence in Australian contemporary art in the 1980s. Her work since 1995 has largely been on aspects of Australia’s colonial past, especially those concerning anonymous women and children. Her most recent work surveys an urban landscape on the verge of destruction, the 2012 Olympic site in east London. She teaches in the Photomedia Studio of Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney and is represented by Stills Gallery, Sydney and Sutton Gallery, Melbourne.

Dr Alison Inglis is a Senior Lecturer and Program Head of Art History at the University of Melbourne.  Since 1995, she has also been the Course Co-ordinator of the Master of Art Curatorship program.  She teaches, researches and publishes in the areas of nineteenth-century art, technical art history and art patronage and collecting.

Odette Kelada is an academic and writer working in Melbourne, at Monash University. She is currently the Research Associate on the ARC Discovery Project Transnational and Cross-Cultural Choreographies in Australia, and writes and researches on the creative arts, race, gender and the politics of identity and representation. She holds a PhD in literature from Charles Sturt University.

Kyla McFarlane is a writer, editor and Assistant Curator - Exhibitions at Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne. Kyla has written on contemporary visual art in Australia and New Zealand since 1996, with a particular emphasis on photography. She has published numerous catalogue essays, articles, book chapters and reviews. Kyla’s curatorial projects at Monash University Museum of Art include The Ecologies Project, with Geraldine Barlow, 2008 and The Line Between Us: The Maternal Relation in Contemporary Photography, 2005. Kyla holds a PhD in visual culture from Monash University which focuses on the relationship between contemporary photography, feminism and psychoanalysis. She has also worked as a pictorial editor at The Age and the New Zealand Herald.

Patrick Pound is a Melbourne based artist. His work ranges from photos of things found flattened on the street, to a collection of Lost Bird posters; from newspaper cuttings of people with their faces covered, to the title pages of CANCELLED library books – Cubism CANCELLED, Painting as a Pastime CANCELLED, Museum Pieces CANCELLED, Great Expectations CANCELLED. In 1995 Pound bought his way into ‘Men of Achievement’ as part of a ten year project called ‘c.v. – a work in progress‘. In 2003 he featured in the Cambridge edition of ‘The International Who’s Who of Intellectuals’, and in 2004 he was named ‘International Artist of the Year’. For fun, he is currently also working on a PhD in art history at Melbourne university. He is represented in Australia by GRANTPIRRIE Gallery in Sydney and in New Zealand by Hamish McKay Gallery, Wellington and Anna Bibby Gallery, Auckland.

Peter Shand is currently Head of the Manukau School of Art in Manukau City and Senior Lecturer in Fine Arts at the University of Auckland. He holds a PhD in Art History from the University of Auckland and an LLM specializing in intellectual and cultural property from King’s College, the University of London. His research interests are concentrated on contemporary creative practices (art, design and fashion) and the inter-relation of art and law. Current projects include essays on New Zealand fashion for the National Gallery of Victoria and Te Papa Tongarewa, the Museum of New Zealand and a book on photographer Fiona Pardington.

Hamish Tocher lives in Wellington and teaches at the Wellington Institute of Technology. His current practice uses projection to create illusory spaces, modeled after the space in the artwork of late classicism and of the Renaissance, in which figures and forms carry out actions that illustrate connections between the past and contemporary imagery. He is interested in deploying and distorting perspectival illusion and anamorphosis. His sculptor friends think it’s hilarious that he’s trying to make things with his hands. In earlier work, he made collages and tableaux that compared historical painting to contemporary fashion images. He also worked with optics and scanners to make crude cameras. He is studying for an MFA from RMIT University. Hamish Tocher is represented by McNamara Gallery, Wanganui, New Zealand.